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Friday5: Five Phases of Filmmaking

From short films and branded documentaries to Vines and tabletop photography, production teams specialize in bringing big creative ideas to life.  We are made up of filmmakers, producers, animators and creative directors from all walks of the industry—from comedy writers to comic book illustrators to live show producers – and work in constant collaboration to produce video content.

When it comes to making videos, we get all sorts of questions, so we’re here to lay it all out and take you through the Five Phases of Filmmaking.

1. Development

“The way to get good ideas is to get lots of ideas and throw the bad ones away.” –Linus Pauling

Before an idea can be developed into a script, there needs to be a creative vision—achieved by collaborating with accounts, creative, planning and other specialty teams to develop a focused insight about the audience and what you want to inspire in them through the content. It’s in this phase that we develop the creative brief and hone in on a treatment that will solve for it. We ask questions like: What’s the overarching story you want to tell? Who is that audience and what do you want them to do? Where is the content going to be consumed? Understanding distribution well in advance of production empowers the creative team to create the best concept for your client. Moreover, staying in line with the objectives outlined during this phase will be the guiding star throughout the process.

2. Pre-Production

“If I had nine hours to chop down a tree, I’d spend the first six sharpening my ax.”  -Abraham Lincoln

This is the time to get organized. In other words, planning, prepping and thinking of potential obstacles before they have a chance to materialize.  This is where we take everything from development and make the project a reality! From developing and locking the perfect script and laying out the full creative and narrative vision, to vetting directors of photography, to location scouting, casting the right talent and if the project calls for it, hiring a prop master and set designer– there is a lot to do! Filmmakers will tell you that pre-production is everything.

Shot lists and storyboards are essential to pre-production. These tools outline the camera angles and sketch out what each scene should look like before getting to set.

3. Production

“Filmmaking is a miracle of collaboration.” –James McAvoy
So it’s production time, when all the planning pays off and all hands are on deck—cast, film crew, the creative team, and even account and client teams. Everyone involved in production has an important role on set. From the director to the hair and makeup artist, to the script supervisor to the almighty gaffer in charge of lights – this is the moment where the professionals own their craft and we bring the script to life.

This video is a fun and easy way to remember who’s who on set and what they do.

4. Post-Production

“First you shoot the movie, then you make the movie” –Keenen Ivory Wayans.

Post-production is where the film comes together. A good editor helps tell a story by finding the best moments from the footage and working closely with the director and creative team to create a compelling narrative. This is also when a film can be fine-tuned with color correction, sound editing, motion graphics, 3D animation, and other finishing techniques to add magic to a piece. Licensing or composing the right music is also key, as most edits are timed and cut around musical moments. Having a skilled post-production team is essential to producing a project that wows.

5. Distribution

“No saint, no pope, no general, no sultan has ever had the power that a filmmaker has: the power to talk to hundreds of millions of people in the dark for two hours.”  -Frank Capra

So the video is picture locked and it’s time to amplify! Remember those questions from the development phase? Having the objectives figured out early on is key to the process and will be especially helpful when it comes to distribution. Thanks to strategic planning, paid media can now do the heavy lifting and effectively distribute the video where it will best be received—bringing the project full circle.

Voila! That’s the filmmaking process in a nutshell.

This post was written by Chris Walker, Natalie Batlle and Ryan VandenBosch.

Image credit: Luke Roberts

Friday5: The STEM Moment in a Post-Network Age

The Five Forces Supporting STEM Students and Their Educators

Last week, I had the pleasure of speaking at the annual summit for one of our clients, Project Lead the Way. PLTW is the nation’s leading provider of learning programs in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM), which not only includes K-12 curricula but professional development for teachers as well.

My talk focused on what I felt were five defining forces that make now a critical moment for STEM education.

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1. “The market for something to believe in is infinite.”

While building the talk, I was reminded of the above Hugh McLeod cartoon that contained this particular aphorism. In terms of the popular imagination and among the lay people, STEM is the source from which that something-to-believe-in springs forth—either as a source of hope for breakthrough cures or simply concepts that inspire and even entertain.

2. Four key “laws” are intersecting to make today a particularly exciting time to participate in STEM.

These aren’t “laws” in the physical-science sense, but rather observations about the human spirit as they relate to technology and innovation. Here they are briefly, in roughly descending order of popular familiarity.

  • Moore’s Law: Coined by Carver Mead on (the reluctant) behalf of Intel co-founder Gordon Moore, this refers to the notion that computing horsepower would double (or the cost of a given amount of power would be halved) every 18-24 months. While the death of this law has been five years from “today” for the past few decades, scientists and engineers keep finding ways to improve computing power nearly as fast as everyone can think of ways to gobble it up.
  • Metcalf’s Law: Coined by Ethernet inventor and 3COM co-founder Bob Metcalfe, this states that the value of a network is equal to the number of participants, squared. So, think about the number of people on the Internet. Now multiply it by itself. Wow.
  • Hayek’s Law: This is a name I’ve given to Austrian economist F.A. Hayek’s prescient 1945 observation: “The knowledge of the circumstances of which we must make use never exists in concentrated or integrated form but solely as the dispersed bits of incomplete and frequently contradictory knowledge which all the separate individuals possess.” Combine this with the phenomenal access to these individuals (Metcalf’s Law) and the power to process the data (Moore’s Law) and you have a powerful platform for innovation and collaboration.
  • Carlson’s Law: As described by The New York Times’ Thomas Friedman in honor of SRI’s Dr. Curtis Carlson, “Innovation from the bottom-up is chaotic, but smart. Innovation from the top-down is orderly, but dumb.” This perhaps modulates Hayek’s Law, counterbalancing freewheeling and even playful innovation with the need for some level of direction and order.
3. STEM produces the most-trusted people in the most-trusted industries.

As a fifth law to consider: “The further one gets into a public talk delivered by an Edelman representative, the probability of hearing about the Trust Barometer approaches one.”

Joking aside, my message to educators was that our research consistently shows that a STEM education aligns most with the most-trusted people when it comes to shaping a company’s reputation. Technical experts, for example, consistently rank second behind more general experts and academics. Further, as to the most-trusted fields, technology has nearly always ranked as the most-trusted industry for the last several years, followed by automotive.

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4. STEM is becoming a team sport that welcomes amateurs

FoldIt allows anyone to download a game onto his or her computer and virtually “fold” simulated proteins, banking on the notion that the human brain is a particularly efficient pattern-recognition engine. In one phenomenal case, game-playing amateurs collectively solved an AIDS-related protein folding problem that vexed scientists for fifteen years—after only ten days!

BOINC allows you to donate your computer’s otherwise idle time to participate in supercomputing applications, such as climate analysis, life sciences, or even searching for E.T. At the time of my talk, the 24-hour average of all of the volunteer computers using BOINC were donating enough computing power to put it at #6 on the Top 500 list of the fastest supercomputers. This puts the collective digital volunteerism of BOINC users right between leviathan-class systems at Argonne National Labs and the Swiss National Computing Centre.

The lesson: Smart scientists are figuring out ways that lay people can participate in the process of discovery. The best are even making it fun.

5. STEM’s “source code” is (slowly, reluctantly) opening

The explosion of open-source technologies and methods makes STEM disciplines more free, both as in “free as in speech” and “free as in ‘free beer,’” to borrow from the distinction made famous by Richard Stallman and others.  This opens up a world of possibilities, emerging from the ability to maximize the usable life of computing equipment, maximize technology spend from the classroom, and (most importantly) teach students the vital importance of “hacking” their world in order to create new insights and realities.

Image credit: @doug88888

Friday5: Win the Moment with Twitter

Whether it’s live-tweeting during the big game or creating real-time images during an awards ceremony, companies are often curious about how to create winning real-time moments on Twitter. While some brands have had success participating in the moment, it continues to be a challenge to tackle real-time content and still help our clients achieve their goals. Recently, Stacy Minero, Twitter’s Head of Content Planning, gave us a few tips on how to help our clients win the moment.

1. Plan the predictable

There are a few things in life that are predictable: the subway will always be delayed when you are running late for a meeting, and it will definitely rain the one day you left your umbrella at home. Likewise, if you will be creating real-time content, or responding in real-time to fans, you know that you will need to be both quick and efficient in order to capitalize on the moment or you will lose relevance. Building visual templates in advance allows you to get it live and in the hands of fans more quickly and will create a coherent look and framework for your social content.

Additionally seek out fans, influencers, and conversations that may help your brand achieve its goals in advance of any activation: these people may already be creating content on your behalf and just don’t know it. Entering into the right conversations with fans can create “micro moments” for your brand outside of larger tent pole activations.

2. Create repeatable brilliance

Have you ever done something so spectacular that you even impressed yourself, only to never be able to recreate it again when asked? Like hitting that last high note in your favorite karaoke song when alone but sounding like a howling cat when surrounded by friends? It happens. So how do you make sure you can recreate that brilliance at all times? In content, it’s about finding what works with your audience, and making sure that you can continue to repeat that success over and over. For example, it can be creating a thematic content series or knowing what topics will always get a reaction from your audience. By creating repeatable serialized content that ladders up to your brand’s strategy you can train your audience to expect amazing, quality content, especially during these live moments.

3. Enhance experiences

Something I have been championing for a while, and recently started hearing from more people at Content Marketing Conferences this year, is that marketers are moving from a brand-centric to a consumer-centric approach to content and community: the brand is no longer the hero, it’s the audience. By thinking about our audience, we can give them the content they want, where they want it, in a way that they want to experience it, ensuring that the content we produce plays an additive role to THEIR experience. Everything you create or respond with should make the moment bigger or better; not just because you want to get involved in the conversation.  

4. Plan to be spontaneous

My favorite part of all of these tips is the idea that you can, and must, plan ahead in order to be spontaneous in the moment. This requires advanced planning and strategy, including smart scenario planning: go through all possible actions and reactions and prepare how your brand would create content or respond to fans. Write sample copy. Create sample images based on possible outcomes. By planning for these situations in advance, we can shift our thinking away from “reacting in real-time” and move towards “preparing to be agile” as a means of creating content.

5. Discovery by Design

In the real-time content flood that is Twitter, it’s getting harder for brands to have their content seen and shared by audiences. By creating a deliberate plan on how you want your content discovered and shared, knowing the hashtags that your audience is using in relation to the event and what you want people to do with it when they see it you can help maximize your reach and better achieve your goals of creating real-time content. And when creating your distribution plan always remember the 4 P’s: Plan for your content, Produce what your audience wants to see and share, Publish it in a timely manner to ensure relevancy, and Promote it as needed in order to increase possible reach.

How are you going to help your clients win the moment with Twitter?

Friday5: Communicate A Cybersecurity Breach Online

In a year filled with constant reminders of significant cyber-attacks, cybersecurity is quickly becoming a principal risk for organizations across all industries, sectors and geographies. In 2014, cybersecurity breaches have increased by 48 percent, showing the growing risk around potential attacks.

One of the side effects of the increase in attention is that many organizations are moving beyond categorizing cyber-related risks as solely the responsibility of IT or security teams. CEOs, boards and communications teams are demanding greater levels of preparedness, training, response capabilities and protocols.

Unfortunately, you can’t plan how to communicate online for every cybersecurity scenario, but it is possible to prepare – and test – responses and processes.

Here are five key digital areas that organizations should keep in mind before, during and after a cybersecurity breach.

1. Create an online hub

All official information that a business publishes during and after a security breach needs to be easily located and visible online. Organizations should prepare an online hub that holds all necessary resources. This hub can take the shape of a “dark site” to use only in emergencies, a microsite or a designated section on a current website. Hubs typically need to serve as a repository for statements made by the organization, FAQs, information about credit monitoring and links to additional resources. The tricky part of these types of resources is that activation time is of the essence. The moment a breach is disclosed, organizations may only have a few hours to respond.

2. Determine social media engagement

Decide how to communicate (or not) on owned social media channels. Creating a streamlined approach with clear guidance on what information will be pushed through social channels will help align expectations for community managers. Social media channels are the closest point to your customers. Therefore, any official communication must be paired with a cohesive engagement strategy to answer questions, help alleviate concerned customers, address hostile critics or trolls and navigate potential litigation. One of the most important components to an engagement strategy are protocols on when NOT to post to social channels. Organizations can also just pick the most appropriate social channels to use.

3. Anticipate the message

The Internet will be flooded with third-party articles, opinions from experts and a spike in brand conversation through social media. This clutter of information can be easier to manage by anticipating stakeholders’ questions and concerns. This will help maintain the view that the organization is a victim of a crime and operating efficiently in its response. This preparation will also help with the overall search engine optimization (SEO) of the organization when stakeholders’ search for answers online.

4. Be mindful of content

Be mindful of new threats to stakeholders. While most stakeholders will be searching the Internet for answers to various concerns such as liability of fraudulent charges and credit monitoring, scammers may take advantage of potential vulnerabilities with email, harmful links and phishing scams. Organizations should be investigating, reporting and communicating about damaging content to all stakeholders, as appropriate – this starts with being mindful of links that the organization includes in its own email correspondence.

5. Analyze data and monitor online

As a business is addressing the concerns, questions and complaints of customers, be mindful of who exactly needs to be reached. It is critical to set benchmarking data in advance of a breach to determine spikes in traffic to any owned property online of a business. During a breach, a business can determine traffic sources to a website. That data will determine the proper monitoring strategy of traffic drivers to a website, and social channels to keep tabs on during a breach for any new information.

How does your organization prepare for a cybersecurity breach?

This post was written by Dan Webber and Tatiana Posada.

Friday5: Cyber Security Month: Communicating a Breach

According to a recent survey by USA Today, nearly a quarter of Americans have stopped buying online due to fear of security breaches. As the frequency of privacy-related issues escalates, consumer demand for transparency regarding how their information is being used has followed suit.

In honor of Cyber Security month, this newsletter is focusing on the firm’s data security and privacy practice, an integrated team of public affairs, corporate and crisis professionals throughout the network.

Here are some examples of both watch-outs and best practices in the wake of a data breach. No matter the company or organization, it is important that the following tips are kept in mind when preparing for, or experiencing, a security breach.

1. Be prepared

The speed and care with which a company addresses the interests and concerns of its customers will dramatically impact stakeholder and influencer perceptions, the tone of media coverage and the media lifecycle of the issue. Whether it’s preparing content and messaging for a dark site in advance, or planning the lines of communication internally in the case of emergency, thorough preparation will help to ensure the company can be the earliest and most accurate source of information for customers.  In addition to preparing communications for reactive response, it is crucial that a company show proactive intent to resolve issues regarding data security, and show an effort to remain up to date and informed on the latest industry wide efforts and initiatives. Organizations such as the Responsible Information Management (RIM) Council and National Retail Federation are increasingly vocal on the issue and could be a key ally in the wake of a data breach.

2. Be forthcoming, but don’t say what you don’t know

Transparency and promptness are key in data breach communications. Oftentimes following a data breach, companies attempt to accommodate demands for more information – whether it’s the source of the compromise or the number of affected individuals – failing to recognize that data-security incidents inevitably have many twists and turns as malware and hackers become more sophisticated.

3. Demonstrate a Bias For Action

In the early stages of a data breach, it is crucial to reassure the consumer by focusing initial messages on the steps being taken to investigate and resolve the issue. Providing resources for consumers, such as offering free identity protection services or providing credit monitoring to any customers who used their cards at your store, helps to shape the overall story surrounding the issue.

4. Pay attention to where you communicate – and who you communicate with

The method of communication that companies use to share news of a breach are nearly as important as the message being delivered, and can impact the tone of media coverage.  For example, at the onset, Target was criticized for using a too-small-to-see website banner to make customers aware of their data breach. However, after some particularly targeted gossip coverage attacked Target’s corporate culture following the breach, Target CMO Jeff Jones took a two-way engagement approach, speaking more directly to consumers through a transparent and thoughtful response on LinkedIn regarding the overarching tenor following the crisis.  His openness and relatable message was met with praise.

5. Get a little outside perspective

The unfortunate reality of a data breach is that company leadership is going to share the blame. Regardless of the amount of control that was executed by leadership over the breach and its effects, bringing in external resources and introducing new leadership roles in the wake of a security breach is often necessary to restore trust in the organization. Whether it’s new roles in the company or third party counsel in the event of a payment-card breach, it is crucial to examine the potential reputation perceptions that can be affected by bringing in new perspective. In Target’s case, introducing outside leadership for the first time enabled the company to be perceived by media and other key stakeholders as being “on the road to brand recovery” and indicated the company recognized that change was required to correct past deficiencies.

Hackers are getting smarter. Is your brand prepared?

For more information on Edelman’s Data Security and Privacy capabilities, please visit http://www.edelman.com/expertise/data-security-privacy/

Friday5: Hispanic Heritage Month: The Digital Trailblazers

September 15 through October 15 was Hispanic Heritage Month in the U.S. This is the final article in the Friday5’s Hispanic Heritage Month series. Find all the articles diving into the Hispanic community’s digital trends at EdelmanDigital.com.

U.S. Hispanics are ahead of the curve when it comes to digital media. They lead in adoption of new devices. They are power users of mobile and over-index in video consumption. The U.S. Hispanic community is a vastly underserved market, and the opportunities to reach them through digital remain largely untapped.

With a population of over 50 million and a buying power of over $1 trillion, Hispanics are a coveted—and growing—audience for marketers to target. Hispanic consumers are on the web, and they’re setting trends in digital media. Let’s look at how brands can reach the Hispanic community with digital media.

1. Be Mobile

According to a Nielsen study, among smartphone owners, Hispanics are 17 percent more likely than non-Hispanics to access the Web through their phone vs. through a computer. They’re also more likely to upgrade or replace their mobile headsets and buy tablets. A lot of that video watching happens on mobile, as smartphones are becoming the “first screen.” Nielsen states that 10 million Hispanics watch mobile video for an average of more than six hours per month.

When it comes to mobile, figure out your mobile-centric use cases, create mobile-first destinations, drive ROI and branding in mobile-specific ways and integrate mobile prominently into multi-screen campaigns.

 2. Use Video

Two brands that have taken this lesson to heart are Universal Pictures and CoverGirl. Universal Pictures has a dedicated Latino channel on YouTube where it distributes custom spots, featurettes, clips and content. CoverGirl sponsors Becky G, a Mexican-American singer/dancer who has a huge following on YouTube among U.S. Hispanics.

3. Connect and Engage With Cultural Relevancy

Constantly connected consumers are influential ones—spreading ideas, culture and content. The Hispanic audience is very connected. Brands can make great use of digital media to connect with this audience. The key is to create culturally relevant experiences that resonate with these consumers.

An example of this is Starbucks “Noches Culturales” (Cultural Nights). Starbucks*, in partnership with the Edelman Multicultural team, helped the brand engage with the Hispanic community.  The program included a series of in-store concerts, highlighting local Latino musicians and giving them a platform for discovery and engagement with their fans.

4. Speak to Their Culture 

Language isn’t enough. To really speak to Hispanics, you need to be culturally relevant. Take, for example, Universal Pictures’ Despicable Me 2. Universal found a way to extract storylines, show relevant talent, use music and use the Spanish language when appropriate—all ways to help make the film attractive and culturally relevant to Hispanic audiences.

 5. Give Them Choices—más opciones

Too often, marketers think they’re reaching U.S. Hispanics by simply translating ads and websites into Spanish. The truth is, this audience is diverse and often bilingual. Through digital, marketers don’t need to take a one-language-fits-all approach—and they shouldn’t, because there is a big opportunity to reach these consumers in both languages. Let the users pick which language they prefer.

Mattel is adopting this approach, creating bilingual versions of its campaigns. Last year, it launched a cross-brand Hispanic-targeted holiday campaign, “Toy Feliz,” which included a bilingual website.

How have you seen the Hispanic community influence digital media?

*An Edelman client

Friday5: 2014 Hispanic Heritage Month: The Hispanic Mobile Community

September 15 through October 15 is Hispanic Heritage Month in the U.S. During the next two weeks the Friday5 will focus on the digital trends regarding this influential and growing audience.

Hispanic consumers are not only the fastest growing demographic in the U.S., they are also leading growth in the ownership of mobile devices. According to Nielsen’s recent Digital Consumer Report, 72 percent of U.S. Hispanics own smartphones. According to BIA/Kelsey’s Consumer Commerce Monitor study, Hispanic consumers also spend more time using mobile devices and are more likely to use those devices for local shopping. Here is some key insight to consider when designing multicultural marketing strategies for mobile campaigns.

1. Hispanic Gen Xers Lead in Daily Tablet Usage

U.S. Hispanics own tablets at a higher rate than the general population and Hispanic Gen Xers are leading the way. According to a recent PricewaterhouseCoopers report, nearly two-thirds of U.S. Hispanics between the ages of 35 and 49 use a tablet every day, making them the leaders in daily tablet content consumption.

2. Latinos Lead U.S. Smartphone Use

According to a Nielsen report, Hispanics are purchasing smartphones faster than any other group of consumers. The report shows that 72 percent of Hispanic adults own smartphones, which is approximately 10 points higher than the national average. Nearly half of the Hispanic consumers surveyed in the report said they planned to upgrade to new devices within the next six months, which is a reflection of their willingness to adopt new technology.

3. Hispanics More Likely to Use Social Apps and Text

A PricewaterhouseCoopers’ report found that 74 percent of US Hispanic mobile phone users used apps to access social media at least once per week, compared to 73 percent for non-Hispanics. U.S. Hispanics were also more likely to communicate on a weekly basis via text messaging. Ninety-six percent of U.S. Hispanics used text messaging on a weekly basis compared to 92 percent of non-Hispanics.

4. Why Pandora is Booming with Hispanic Users

According to ComScore, Pandora was the No. 1 music streaming service for Hispanics for the month of June. Hispanics accounted for 25 percent of Pandora’s 76.4 million actively monthly unique visitors (MUV’s), which represents approximately 19 million Hispanic MUV’s. According to Experian’s 2014 Market Overview report, Hispanics are 17 percent more likely than non-Hispanics to access the Internet through their phone than a computer. In a move that recognizes this trend, iHeartMedia announced it will produce its first-ever Latin music festival in partnership with Live Nation. iHeartRadio Fiesta Latina is set to take place Nov. 22 at the Forum in Los Angeles and will feature performances by Ricky Martin, Daddy Yankee and many others. iHeartMedia’s music streaming company iHeartRadio is Pandora’s direct competitor.

5. US Hispanic Millennials More Receptive to Mobile Ads

According to an Experian report, U.S. Hispanic Millennials: Bridging Cultural and Technology Gaps, Hispanic millennials are more receptive to mobile advertising compared to their non-Hispanic counterparts.  The study found that 18.7 percent of Hispanic consumers ages 18 to 34 were open to receiving ads on their mobile devices as compared to 8.5 percent of non-Hispanics in the same age group. 40 percent of Hispanics in this age group preferred to receive mobile ads in both English and Spanish.

What tips do you have for targeting the Hispanic mobile community?

This post was written by Melissa Quinones, Yocasta Shames & Will Ayers

Friday5: 2014 Hispanic Heritage Month: Tailoring Paid Campaigns to Reach Hispanics Online

September 15 through October 15 is Hispanic Heritage Month in the U.S. During the next two weeks the Friday5 will focus on the digital trends regarding this influential and growing audience.

“Pay-to-play” has become the defining phrase in digital communications over the past few years, and it’s even truer when trying to reach the multicultural audience. As paid promotion becomes increasingly important online, here are a few tips to ensure you optimize your next paid media campaign to reach the Hispanic community:

1. English vs. Spanish

The Hispanic community is becoming increasingly bilingual – primarily Spanish and English – and their online habits reflect this trend. Nearly three-fourths of U.S. Hispanics speak Spanish at home, yet 45 percent of Hispanic Millennials prefer to browse in English. Many paid distributors allow targeting based on browser language setting, so consider targeting both English and Spanish browser settings in your next campaign – regardless of whether the content is Spanish or English.

2. Mobile vs. Desktop

More than any other community, Hispanics connect using mobile devices – namely smartphones. They browse social networks, read news and stream video all from their phones, so it’s essential that your online campaign is designed to have mobile reach. That means if you’re creating digital assets for a campaign, make sure they are mobile optimized; and incorporate mobile targeting in your paid media plans.

3. Online Video vs. Television

Beyond heavy mobile use in general, Hispanics watch disproportionately more video on their phones. On average, Hispanics spend eight hours each month watching online video, compared to 6.5 hours a month for the average American. Short form videos (3-minutes or less) are increasingly popular among this audience and surpassing television viewing for the younger Hispanic generations. As part of your next Hispanic-focused program, consider incorporating shareable video as owned content or creative for a targeted paid campaign.

4. Micro-targeting vs. One-Size-Fits-All

“Hispanic” cannot be used as a blanket term. Hispanic men differ from women, Hispanic youth differ from older generations, and Hispanics in California may differ from those in Miami in how they use the Internet and the type of content they consume. Therefore, micro-targeting across demographics is essential. Craft tailored messages for specific audience segments and do not be afraid to experiment with new platforms to reach different groups within the Hispanic community.

5. Test and Test Again

Statistics are great, and they lead to audience insights that we cannot always gather first-hand. However, at the end of day, testing is the only way to know what truly works on a case-by-case basis. Plan your digital campaigns to be flexible, so you can test and tailor key messages and delivery of your ads. Experiment with new creative and different platforms to see what performs best and, ultimately, fulfills your campaign goals.

What tips do you have for targeting the Hispanic community online?

Friday5: 2014 Hispanic Heritage Month: Latinos and Social Media

September 15 through October 15 is Hispanic Heritage Month in the U.S. During the next three weeks the Friday5 will focus on the digital trends around this influential and growing audience.

Latinos make up 80 percent of active users on social media, surpassing the non-Hispanics by 10 percent, according to a Pew Research Center’s Internet Project. In order to connect with this burgeoning community, it is extremely important to be culturally relevant and consistent. The bottom line is that they need to know that brands understand and value them to drive engagement and sales.

Here are a few social media channels that your brands should be engaging this community with:

1. Twitter

In a Pew Hispanic Center survey, about 58 percent Latino Internet users on social networking sites like Twitter. Latino users are looking for a way to engage in a two- way conversation with brands. The platform has some of the highest brand-to-consumer engagement which ultimately drives to sales.

2. Facebook

Facebook has seen the importance of connecting brands with the U.S. Hispanic community and developing a market strategy to serve agencies and advertisers and help them target this community. The strategy plans to create an online social engagement platform which embraces their feedback and flows into the brands innovation pipeline.

3. Tumblr

Tumblr serves 2.3 million unique Hispanic visitors monthly and, at least online, it rivals the likes of Univision.com, terra.com and MNS Latino. Nielsen notes that among the top social networks in the U.S., Tumblr has the highest concentration of Hispanic visitors.

4. YouTube

Over-indexing in video consumption, YouTube presents the opportunity to create content that represents and connects the Hispanic community. A production company, MITU, has gone from making television programming to developing a whole network geared toward Hispanic-Americans. It’s a multi-channel network that has assembled the largest collection of Latino content creators on the Web and has become one of the largest media companies providing digital content to the Latino market globally. Now in 2014, the network has four channels and over six billion views.

5. Instagram

According to Pew Research Center study, Latinos are more likely to use Instagram than other groups. Some ways that brands can connect with this demographic on social channel is by focusing on healthy lifestyles and celebrating Hispanic culture.

Is your brand incorporating social media an integral part of its Hispanic marketing strategy?

This post was written by Fabiola Nunez, Melissa Quinones, & Yocasta Shames

Image credit: Al_HikesAZ

Friday5 – 2014 Hispanic Heritage Month: A Hyper-Engaged Community

September 15 to October 15 is Hispanic Heritage Month in the U.S. During the next four weeks the Friday5 will focus on the digital trends around this influential and growing audience.

Latinos have a remarkable presence in the U.S. – they are the largest minority in the country with more than 54 million Hispanics (16.7 percent of total population) as of 2013. This is just the tip of the iceberg – Latinos have a purchasing power estimated to reach $1.5 trillion by 2015, while Latino consumers are approximately 10 years younger than the average consumer. Latino digital presence is a force to be reckoned with as they are more likely to download apps, chat, stream video, listen to music and play games than non-Hispanics, making them a hyper-engaged group.

1. Younger and connected

As one of the fastest-growing segments of the U.S. population, Hispanic millennials are mostly native-born and prefer English over Spanish while still embracing their Hispanic roots.  AdWeek dubbed Latinos as digitally savvy, young and socially connected – a marketer’s dream come true. Latinos are part of native mainstream media and pop culture but possess a deep understanding of their origin.

2. Social media, social media, social media

Technology has fortified the link between Latino’s passions and their peers. According to eMarketer, three-quarters of the growing Hispanic population actively utilize social media (72 percent of U.S. Hispanic Internet users will use social networking in 2014 vs. 68 percent of the total population in the U.S.) For brands, this digital influence makes Latinos an ideal community to target.

They are also savvy shoppers who tend to engage with peers about their purchases through social media. They also maintain a strong connection to traditional media outlets. Compared to non-Hispanics, Latinos are overwhelmingly more engaged with radio, infomercials, and billboards.

3. Do not generalize!

The Latino community is as diverse as it is substantial. There is no neat, specific classification that defines all 54 million of them. Brands are reexamining the way they target Hispanics and throwing out old clichés in favor of more culturally relevant. “[Latino millenials] are a versatile bunch. They ping-pong between cultures, languages, interests and behaviors,” said Andrew Orcí, CEO of California based multicultural ad agency, Orcí. As brands begin to embrace the diversity within their community, marketing methods will evolve.

4. Brands attempting to tap this market

Some brands are doing it right. In 2013 Univision launched a bilingual UVideos digital platform meant to target young Hispanics. Unilever* also launched a campaign in 2006 called Vive Mejor (“Live Better”), a Latina-inspired effort to offer beauty and household advice for Hispanic women. The campaign works across different platforms, starting with the ViveMejor.com website, as well as renowned spokespeople, social media activations, and events across key cities. Competitors, such as P&G, were quick to follow these steps.

5. Early adopters and Trendsetters

Relative to the rest of the population, Hispanics are more often first in line to purchase new technologies, including smartphones and tablets. Not only do they enjoy trying new products (31 percent of Hispanics, as opposed to 14 percent of the non-Hispanic population), they set the trends. Nearly a third of Hispanics also enjoy telling their friends about their new purchases.

How does your brand address the growing Hispanic market in the U.S.?

*Edelman client

This post was written by Melissa Quinones and Yocasta Shames.

Image credit: moodboard

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